Where is Princeton University located

Princeton University

history

organization

campus

The campus, which extends over 200 acres of land, features an abundance of neo-Gothic style buildings, many of them over 200 years old. Some newer structures have been built in the style of modern architecture, and a variety of sculptures can be found on campus.

The majority of the students live on campus. In later semesters, students also have the option of looking for their own apartment. However, since rents in Princeton are very high, many don't. In their free time, students can take advantage of a variety of leisure activities: Princeton University has its own indoor swimming pool and tennis courts, and the university also has its own lake.

Faculties

Teaching for courses with a bachelor's degree is organized into 34 departments. There is graduation Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in Engineering.

Beyond the bachelor's degree, there are degrees Master of Arts,Master of Architecture (M.Arch.),Master of Engineering (M.Eng.),Master in Finance (M.Fin.),Master of Science in Engineering (M.S.E.),Master of Science (in Chemistry, M.S.),Master in Public Affairs (M.P.A.),Master in Public Policy (M.P.P.) and Master in Public Affairs and Urban and Regional Planning (M.P.A.-U.R.P.) can be achieved. The doctorate is awarded by all departments. Professors are not released to research, but always have to teach.[7]

Although Princeton is one of the leading elite universities in the United States, there is no School of Law. This fact is often unknown, even in films and series, references are often made to elitist law students from Princeton, although these do not even exist (e.g. The Prince of Bel-Air).

Admission of the students

Princeton follows an admissions policy that ignores applicants' solvency. The university pays any differences to the very high tuition fees in the form of scholarships from its own capital stock. Around 60% of the first-year students in 2012 received financial support from the university,[7] which averages US $ 28,930 (66.6% of the total cost of US $ 43,425) per year. Despite this admission policy, which also enables children of parents of lower income groups to study at the renowned university, a large part of the student body is made up of children from wealthy families. Currently, approximately 10% of students are Princeton alumni children.

Sights on campus

The Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton University's own art museum, gives an impression of its wealth: it contains works by many famous artists, including Claude Monet and Andy Warhol. The university has an important library to which the Scheide Library is attached.

Sports

The sports teams are those Tigers. The university is a member of the Ivy League. The university's mascot is a tiger, and the school colors are orange and black.

Nobel Prize Winner

Personalities with ties to the university

Due to its considerable international reputation, Princeton University has a large number of thinkers from all over the world as alumni:

  • James Madison, US President

  • Woodrow Wilson, US President

  • Albert Einstein, physicist and Nobel Prize winner

  • John Foster Dulles, former US Secretary of State

  • F. Scott Fitzgerald, writer

  • Toni Morrison, writer and Nobel Prize winner

  • Elena Kagan, Supreme Court Justice

  • Michelle Obama, former first lady

  • Jhumpa Lahiri, Pulitzer Prize winner

  • Hannah Arendt (1906–1975) - political theorist; first woman with a professorship in Princeton (visiting professor for one semester 1959)
  • Clifford Geertz (1926-2006) - American ethnologist. He is considered to be the most important representative of interpretive ethnology
  • Hobey Baker (1892-1918) - ice hockey player
  • Meredith Michaels-Beerbaum (* 1969) - show jumper
  • James Baker (born 1930) - Minister under US President George H. W. Bush
  • Ben Bernanke (* 1953) - head of the US Federal Reserve Bank
  • Jeff Bezos (* 1964) - founder of Amazon.com
  • Manjul Bhargava (* 1974) - mathematician, Fields Medal 2014
  • Julian Bigelow (1913–2003) - engineer, computer pioneer
  • W. Michael Blumenthal (* 1926) - US Treasury Secretary under Jimmy Carter and director of the Jewish Museum Berlin
  • Bill Bradley (born 1943) - former basketball star, member of the Basketball Hall of Fame, former US Senator
  • Aaron Burr (1756–1836) - Vice President of the United States under Thomas Jefferson
  • Dean Cain (born 1966) - actor who played Superman in the television series Lois and Clark
  • Heliane Canepa (* 1948) - entrepreneur
  • Frank Carlucci (1930–2018) - Secretary of Defense under Ronald Reagan
  • Rudolf Carnap (1891–1970) - philosopher
  • Alonzo Church (1903–1995) - mathematician, one of the founders of theoretical computer science
  • William Colby (1920–1996) - director of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)
  • John Horton Conway (1937-2020) - mathematician
  • Ingrid Daubechies (* 1954) - mathematician
  • Martin Davis (* 1928) - logician
  • Kemal Derviş (* 1949) - Vice President of the World Bank 1996–2001, Turkish Finance and Economics Minister 2001–2002
  • David Duchovny (born 1960) - actor, best known for his role in the television series X-Files
  • John Foster Dulles (1888–1959) - politician and former US Secretary of State
  • Richard Exner (1929–2008) - literary scholar and poet
  • Jim Flaherty (1949-2014) - Secretary of the Treasury
  • Gerd Faltings (* 1954) - mathematician, Fields Medal 1986, proof of Mordell's conjecture
  • José Ferrer (1912–1992) - Academy Award and Tony Award recipient
  • Joschka Fischer (* 1948) - former German Foreign Minister and Vice Chancellor (guest lecturer)
  • F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896-1940) - author
  • Malcolm Forbes (1919–1990), Steve Forbes (* 1947) - editors of the Forbes magazine
  • Kurt Gödel (1906–1978) - mathematician and logician
  • John Hopfield (* 1933) - physicist, molecular biologist, neuroscientist
  • Carl Icahn (born 1936) - billionaire and investor
  • Julian Jaynes (1920–1997) - psychologist and author of the work The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind
  • Robert E. Kahn (* 1938) - one of the co-inventors of the TCP / IP protocol
  • George F. Kennan (1904-2005) - ambassador
  • John F. Kennedy (1917–1963) - US President, was de-registered after his first year due to jaundice
  • Brian W. Kernighan (* 1942) - co-developer of the programming languages awk and C, Co-author of The C Programming Language
  • Nina L. Khrushcheva - granddaughter of the former head of government of the USSR Nikita Sergeevich Khrushchev, professor at New School University, New York
  • Stefan Kozinski (1953–2014) - composer, conductor, arranger, pianist
  • Saul Kripke (* 1940) - philosopher
  • Henry Lee III ("Lighthorse Harry") (1756-1818) - father of Robert E. Lee
  • Bernard Lewis (1916–2018) - British historian and doyen of Islamic studies, taught at the Department for Near Eastern Studies until 1986
  • David Kellogg Lewis (1941-2001) - philosopher
  • James Madison (1751–1836) - former President of the United States
  • Oskar Morgenstern (1902–1977) - co-founder of game theory
  • Ralph Nader (* 1934) - consumer advocate and advocate of consumerism
  • Joyce Carol Oates (born 1938) - American author
  • Michelle Obama (* 1964) - wife of the 44th US President Barack Obama
  • Max Otte (* 1964) - German-American economist
  • John von Neumann (1903–1957) - chemical engineer, mathematician and physicist
  • George Parros (born 1979) - ice hockey player
  • David Petraeus (* 1952) - General in the US Army and former CIA director
  • David Remnick (* 1958) - New York journalist
  • Neil Leon Rudenstine - former President of Harvard University
  • Donald Rumsfeld (* 1932) - Secretary of Defense under George W. Bush
  • George Rupp - former President of Columbia University
  • Jonathan Safran Foer (born 1977) - writer
  • Paul Sarbanes (1933-2020) - US Senator
  • George P. Shultz (1920–2021) - US Secretary of State under Ronald Reagan
  • Charles Schwab (born 1937) - US entrepreneur
  • Harold Tafler Shapiro (* 1935) - former President of Princeton University
  • Brooke Shields (born 1965) - actress
  • Ruth J. Simmons (* 1945) - first female and first black president of an Ivy League university (Brown University)
  • Peter Singer (* 1946) - philosopher
  • Sonia Sotomayor (* 1954) - Supreme Court judge
  • James Stewart (1908-1997) - actor
  • Donna Strickland (* 1959) - Nobel Prize Winner in Physics
  • Péter Szondi (1929–1971) - literary scholar (guest lecturer 1965)
  • Terence Tao (* 1975) - mathematician
  • Robert Tarjan (* 1948) - computer scientist, inventor of a large number of algorithms in graph theory, winner of the Turing Prize (1986)
  • Shirley M. Tilghman (* 1946) - President of Princeton University from 2001 to 2013
  • Alan Turing (1912–1954) - pioneer of computer science, inventor of the Turing machine and the Turing test
  • Katrina vanden Heuvel (* 1959) - editor-in-chief of The Nation
  • Paul Volcker (1927–2019) - predecessor of Alan Greenspan as Chairman of the US Federal Reserve
  • Cornel West (* 1953) - intellectual of Afro-American descent
  • Meg Whitman (* 1956) - CEO of Hewlett Packard (also from Ebay for a long time)
  • Thornton Wilder (1897–1975) - author of Our Town, premiered at Princeton
  • Andrew Wiles (* 1953) - mathematician who proved the great Fermat theorem
  • Robert R. Wilson (1914–2000) - electrical engineer, physicist, worked on the atomic bomb
  • Woodrow Wilson (1856–1924) - former President of the United States, former President of the Princeton University
  • Edward Witten (* 1951) - mathematician, physicist
  • Sheldon Wolin (1922-2015) - political scientist
  • Wentworth Miller (born 1972) - actor

See also

literature

  • The first centennial anniversary of the College of New Jersey. Celebrated June 1847. J. T. Robinson, Princeton, N.J. 1848 (archive.org).
  • John McLean: History of the College of New Jersey. From its origin in 1746 to the commencement of 1854. Volume I. J. B. Lippingcott & Co., Philadelphia 1877 (archive.org).
  • The Princeton book: a series of sketches pertaining to the history, organization and present condition of the College of New Jersey. The Riverside Press, Cambridge 1879 (archive.org).
  • Laws of the College of New Jersey. 1888 (archive.org).
  • William Milligan Sloane: Princeton in American history. An address delivered to a company of historical pilgrims. 1895 (archive.org).
  • George McLean Harper, John De Witt, Charles Woodruff Shields (Eds.): Memorial book of the Sesquicentennial celebration of the founding of the College of New Jersey and of the ceremonies inaugurating Princeton university. (Part 1: An account of the sesquicentennial celebration. Part 2: Letters and telegrams of congratulations. Part 3: Historical sketch of Princeton university.) Charles Scribner’s sons, New York 1898 (archive.org).
  • John Rogers Williams: Handbook of Princeton. Grafton Press, New York 1905 (archive.org, with many photos of the buildings).
  • Francis E. Blake: History of the town of Princeton, in the county of Worcester and commonwealth of Massachusetts, 1759-1915. Volume 1. Published by the Town of Princeton 1915 (archive.org).
  • Edwin Mark Norris: The story of Princeton. Illustrated with drawings by Lester G. Hornby. Little, Brown and company, Boston 1917 (archive.org).

Web links

Footnotes

  1. Office of the President. Princeton University, accessed December 3, 2020.
  2. These are the richest US universities, Wirtschaftswoche, February 18, 2015, accessed on September 16, 2015.
  3. The 29 most successful Princeton alumni of all time. In: Business Insider. (businessinsider.com [accessed February 9, 2018]).
  4. ^ Princeton history
  5. ↑ Stanley Elkins and Eric McKitrick: The Age of Federalism. Oxford University Press, New York 1993, pp. 81-85.
  6. Constitutional Convention of 1787, The ,. Retrieved November 20, 2017.
  7. abUte Mehnert: If you just want to research, you should go. Interview, June 2, 2013, accessed June 2, 2013

40.3425-74.655833333333 Coordinates: 40 ° 20 ′ 33 ″ N, 74 ° 39 ′ 21 ″ W.