Can darkness produce any energy

Why do deep sea fish produce light?

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To camouflage or attract prey.

Dark abyss: From a depth of 1000 meters it is pitch black. But the deepest point of the oceans is 11,034 meters in the Mariana Trench, a deep-sea channel in the western Pacific Ocean. Lots of lights: The deep sea still holds many secrets. But it is estimated that 15 to 20 percent of all fish species live there. And that 90 percent of the creatures living in this darkness produce some kind of light. This phenomenon is called bioluminescence. It is true that deep-sea fish cannot light up themselves. But they keep bacteria that generate light by oxidizing a fluorescent substance (luciferin) with the help of an enzyme (luciferase), which creates energy in the form of light. Different techniques: The light helps with the prey hunt: The female frogfish, for example, wears such a bait organ (fishing rod) on the forehead. Prey animals consider the bright point to be a glowing shrimp and are eaten themselves. The black dragonfish, on the other hand, has a red searchlight that is invisible to other animals. Paradoxically, the light can also act as a camouflage: hatchet fish and lantern fish illuminate their belly side in the transition zone between absolute darkness and twilight so that predators cannot see them when viewed from below. Widespread: Bioluminescence is not reserved for the deep sea. It occurs everywhere from the protozoa to the fish. Some types of mushrooms, such as the honey mushroom, can also glow. Only vertebrates and higher plants living on land do not know this phenomenon. However, not all deep-sea bacteria use the same luciferins and luciferases, which is why light with different wavelengths or colors green, blue, red is produced. Since these bacteria are constantly glowing, the fish have developed special organs to be able to switch the light on and off.

Lots of lights: The deep sea still holds many secrets. But it is estimated that 15 to 20 percent of all fish species live there. And that 90 percent of the creatures living in this darkness produce some kind of light. This phenomenon is called bioluminescence. It is true that deep-sea fish cannot light up themselves. But they keep bacteria that generate light by oxidizing a fluorescent substance (luciferin) with the help of an enzyme (luciferase), which creates energy in the form of light.

Different techniques: The light helps in the hunt for prey: The female frogfish, for example, wears such a bait organ (fishing rod) on the forehead. Prey animals consider the bright point to be a glowing shrimp and are eaten themselves. The black dragonfish, on the other hand, has a red searchlight that is invisible to other animals. Paradoxically, the light can also act as a camouflage: hatchet fish and lantern fish illuminate their belly side in the transition zone between absolute darkness and twilight so that predators cannot see them when viewed from below.

Widespread: Bioluminescence is not reserved for the deep sea. It occurs everywhere from the protozoa to the fish. Some types of mushrooms, such as the honey mushroom, can also glow. Only vertebrates and higher plants living on land do not know this phenomenon.

By the way! Find out more here

Until the year 1860, people considered life beyond a water depth of 500 meters to be excluded. However, the scientists brooded when in 1860 several animal species were found on a deep-sea cable laid between Sardinia and North Africa, which must have settled on it at a depth of 2000 meters. That was the starting shot for exploring the deep sea. In the decades that followed, marine researchers plunged into ever greater depths and discovered thousands of previously unknown animal species. Scientists are certain that even today the deep sea has by no means revealed all of its secrets and that it may even hide millions of unknown creatures.


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