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Hello!

I am currently studying Biology / Pre Med in the USA in the 3rd semester and wanted to inquire about the possibility of continuing to study in Germany with a Bachelor's degree. Not from the beginning, of course, but rather after graduation, so to speak.
I plan to attend an American medical school after graduating from college, but it is well known that it is quite difficult to get a place there and that is why I would like to have an alternative.
So does anyone know of this possibility?
In the last few weeks I have heard from various people here in the States that they might want to attend a medical school in Germany, which made me pissed off.

Not from the beginning, of course, but rather after graduation, so to speak. First of all, the wording of the currently valid license to practice medicine:



§ 12


Crediting of study times and course achievements


(1) For students who are Germans within the meaning of Article 116 of the Basic Law, citizens of a member state of the European Union or another signatory state of the Agreement on the European Economic Area or homeless foreigners within the meaning of the law on the legal status of homeless foreigners in the federal territory in the in the Federal Law Gazette Part III, structure number 243-1, published corrected version, last amended by Article 19 of the law of December 3, 2001 (Federal Law Gazette I p. 3306), the competent authority under state law counts on the training provided for in this ordinance, insofar as Equivalence is given, in whole or in part, to:


1. Periods of related studies conducted in Germany,


2. Periods of medical studies or related studies conducted abroad.


(2) Under the prerequisites of paragraph 1, the body responsible under state law recognizes study and examination achievements that have been taken within the framework of a course according to paragraph 1 No. 1 and 2. This does not apply to coursework and examinations that complete the course or that have already been the subject of a domestic examination and have definitely not been passed.


(3) In the case of other students, the crediting mentioned in paragraph 1 and the recognition mentioned in paragraph 2 can take place.


(4) Crediting or recognition takes place upon application. The competent authority of the country in which the applicant is enrolled or admitted to study medicine is responsible for the decisions under paragraphs 1 to 3. For students who have not yet been enrolled or accepted to study medicine at a university in Germany, the competent authority in the country in which the applicant was born is responsible. If no responsibility arises from this, the competent authority of the state of North Rhine-Westphalia is responsible.


This means that you have to submit an application to the body responsible according to the above text to determine whether your previous academic achievements are "equivalent" and whether you can simply start in Germany after the Physikum if you get a place at the university.


Greeting,

The Frog

I plan to attend an American medical school after graduating from college, but it is well known that it is quite difficult to get a place there and that is why I would like to have an alternative.
So does anyone know of this possibility?

You cannot just join after the Physikum. Inorganic and organic chemistry and physics, for example, are equivalent, but the other areas such as anatomy are hardly recognized. After all, it is the case in the USA that anatomy, histology, etc. are taught in the first year of medical school. The corresponding undergraduate courses do not help because they have a completely different orientation. Biochemistry and physiology, for example, are not dealt with deeply enough and the inclusion of pathological contexts is usually very superficial. In order to get the whole Physikum recognized, you are missing a few critical subjects, at most a few courses will be recognized.

But if you find a university that recognizes the Physikum, please let me know immediately ;-)



In the last few weeks I have heard from various people here in the States that they might want to attend a medical school in Germany, which made me pissed off.

But they also start from the beginning. Hardly any go to Germany (although I've already heard that), but Hungary, Poland, and the Caribbean are popular options for Americans who have failed to take part. With the exception of the Caribbean, in which the universities are based on the American model, they have to start the 6-year course from scratch.

You cannot just join after the Physikum. Inorganic and organic chemistry and physics, for example, are equivalent, but the other areas such as anatomy are hardly recognized. After all, it is the case in the USA that anatomy, histology, etc. are taught in the first year of medical school. The corresponding undergraduate courses do not help because they have a completely different orientation. Biochemistry and physiology, for example, are not dealt with deeply enough and the inclusion of pathological contexts is usually very superficial. In order to get the whole Physikum recognized, you are missing a few critical subjects, at most a few courses will be recognized.

But if you find a university that recognizes the Physikum, please let me know immediately ;-)



But they also start from the beginning. Hardly any go to Germany (although I've already heard that), but Hungary, Poland, and the Caribbean are popular options for Americans who have failed to take part. With the exception of the Caribbean, in which the universities are based on the American model, they have to start the 6-year course from scratch.
Very well then, that doesn't sound very attractive. Then I would rather concentrate on my courses in order to get to the medical school, because going back to Germany is really not an option. Nevertheless, thanks for the information.

Very well then, that doesn't sound very attractive. Then I would rather concentrate on my courses in order to get to the medical school, because going back to Germany is really not an option. Nevertheless, thanks for the information.

And now a little unsolicited advice. Why are you studying biology? Studying medicine in the USA offers you the unique opportunity to study something different for your bachelor's degree. You will still have enough biology in medical studies, practically everything you learn as a bio major is even deepened in medical studies (well, except ecology, evolution and so on). Since, according to your profile, you are only in the second semester, you still have the opportunity to change your subject. You only have to take the premed subjects, but otherwise you can study what you want. Study something you enjoy other than biology. Also something that enriches your career as a doctor. And last but not least, something that will give you an advantage when applying to study medicine. Bio majors have the second lowest intake rate, after allied health (nursing etc.) students! An important component of applying is that you are unique. And a less common major would be a good start.

Also, if this applies to you, keep in mind that admission to medical school can be difficult with an F1 visa. Many universities only accept citizens and permanent residents.

@ mattel / littlewood: how long have you been living in the USA? I was there between 1996 and 2004. After high school I moved back to Germany because I would hardly get any scholarships because of my situation and therefore college was more or less unaffordable for me. Incidentally, after a year of civilian life, I'm now in Hanover with med. study at. Let’s hear from you because I’d really care. I really want to go back to the USA after my studies.

@ mattel / littlewood: how long have you been living in the USA? I was there between 1996 and 2004. After high school I moved back to Germany because I would hardly get any scholarships because of my situation and therefore college was more or less unaffordable for me. Incidentally, after a year of civilian life, I'm now in Hanover with med. study at. Let’s hear from you because I’d really care. I really want to go back to the USA after my studies.

I've been here for a little over 4 years. After graduating from high school, I had the choice between a girlfriend or a medical degree straight away. Well, I decided to take the longer route and went to the USA. College funding is a thing of course. Fortunately, that worked for me and the thing is barely affordable with scholarships and a lot of work (with miserable wages).

To be honest, I don't know yet whether I want to stay after graduation. As an employee you're the last one here, so I'll have to think twice about it.

And now a little unsolicited advice. Why are you studying biology? Studying medicine in the USA offers you the unique opportunity to study something different for your bachelor's degree. You will still have enough biology in medicine, practically everything you learn as a bio major is even deepened in medicine (well, except ecology, evolution and so on). Since, according to your profile, you are only in the second semester, you still have the opportunity to change your subject. You only have to take the premed subjects, but otherwise you can study what you want. Study something you enjoy other than biology. Also something that enriches your career as a doctor. And last but not least, something that will give you an advantage when applying to study medicine. Bio majors have the second lowest intake rate, after allied health (nursing etc.) students! An important component of applying is that you are unique. And a less common major would be a good start.

Also, if this applies to you, keep in mind that admission to medical school with an F1 visa can be difficult. Many universities only accept citizens and permanent residents.

Hmm, to be honest I thought that with a major in biology I would have the best chance of being accepted into medical school. I'm pretty much in the dark anyway when it comes to the chances of actually getting into the med school. Am I right in assuming you made the record? I would be happy if we could exchange some information on this.

At the moment I'm in the third semester and I would definitely like to take another major, but I definitely don't want to minimize my chances of being accepted.

Hmm, to be honest I thought that with a major in biology I would have the best chance of being accepted into medical school. I'm pretty much in the dark anyway when it comes to the chances of actually getting into the med school. Am I right in assuming you made the record? I would be happy if we could exchange some information on this.

Unfortunately not yet, I am currently in the application phase this year. As a result, all these things are very omnipresent to me at the moment. You are welcome to write to me via pm with your instant messenger details, please answer any questions you have.



At the moment I'm in the 3rd semester and I would definitely like to take another major, but I definitely don't want to minimize my chances of being accepted.

The following website has all the statistics on applicants and accepted students:
http://www.aamc.org/data/facts/start.htm

With a focus on the major, there is the following table:
http://www.aamc.org/data/facts/2004/mcatgpabymaj1.htm

There you can see which major have the highest admission rates. Although there are other factors
There are a few things to consider, e.g. everyone who doesn't know anything else studies bio. This means that the number of biology students is higher, but some of them are not as motivated as students from other subjects.
But even then, several med schools have confirmed to me that they prefer to take people from other areas. Amazingly, students from the humanities, for example, have the second or third highest admission rate!

What you need for an application is the required subjects (usually Bio I / II, GChem I / II, OChem I / II, Physics I / II, all with a lab, maybe one more specific subject depending on the university) and an MCAT score. Then there are tons of other factors that influence your application (GPA, letters of recommendation, extracurricular activities, research experience, even the application essays!). The premed advisor, which almost every university has, should be able to help you, but unfortunately most of them are not useful and you have to get the relevant information yourself.

Hello,

I also went to college, dropped out after 3 semesters and then started medicine in Germany.
For me it was different with the bogus recognition. Basically, I think it depends on how "Americanophile" the respective German professor is who is supposed to recognize an achievement.
And even if you have to take another exam in chemistry or bio, you can do it without any learning effort if you had previously taken a corresponding course at college.
On the other hand, you can't take the really complex subjects of the German preclinical college at college (at least you couldn't do it at mine).
So if you are thinking of studying medicine in Germany, I would drop out of college, start over here and try to get a few certificates recognized ...

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